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Supreme Court ruling could help Washington Redskins get trademark


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- Carrie Healey | AOL.com
A rock band called "The Slants" is singing the Supreme Court's praises after it ruled on Monday that a law forbidding the registration of an offensive trademark is unconstitutional.

The justices ruled 8-0 that a 71-year-old trademark law banning disparaging terms infringes on freedom of speech.

The group's success even after the U.S. Patent and Trademark office said it couldn't trademark their name because it is disparaging toward Asian Americans, may turn out to be a win for the NFL's Washington Redskins.

RELATED: Washington Redskins name controversy

The NFL organization doesn't have a trademark on their name because of the same law that says you cannot obtain a trademark that is disparaging against a group of people.

An attorney for the Redskins said the team was thrilled with the court's decision. Team owner Dan Snyder echoed the sentiment in a statement to CSN, saying, "I am THRILLED! Hail to the Redskins."

The Trademark office stripped the team's trademark back in 2014, saying its name was offensive to Native Americans.

Washington Redskins name controversy

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  • Ian Washburn
    LANDOVER MD, NOVEMBER 16: Ian Washburn, a thrid-generation Redskins fan and season ticket holder wears his altered football wear. He repalced the Redskins name with the word Washington or the 'DC' for the logo. Shown before the Washington Redskins lost to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at FedEx Field in Landover MD, November 16, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • Native Americans and Supporters Protest the Washington Redskins
    LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: Tara Houska, right, joins other Native Americans and supporters to protest the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. Houska is co-founder of the organization notyourmascots.org (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • Native Americans and Supporters Protest the Washington Redskins
    LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: Washington Redskins fans walk past as Native Americans and supporters protest the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. The protesters could not get on to the grounds at FedEx Field so Jericho City of Praise is offered them space. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • Native Americans and Supporters Protest the Washington Redskins
    LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 28: 'We are people, not your mascot,' shouts Adrianne Plenty Holes as she points to her baby Yamni Plenty Holes, 11 months, while participating in a protest of the name and logo of the Washington Football team before the game on Sunday, December 28, 2014. The protesters could not get on to the grounds at FedEx Field so Jericho City of Praise is offered them space. (Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • Washington Redskins v Minnesota Vikings
    MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 2: People march to TCF Bank Stadium to protest against the mascot for the Washington Redskins before the game against the Minnesota Vikings on November 2, 2014 at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opponents of the Redskins name believe it's a slur that mocks Native American culture and they want the team to change it. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
  • The Washington Redskins play the Minnesota Vikings
    MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans and other citizens taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, walk outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • The Washington Redskins play the Minnesota Vikings
    MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, march outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • The Washington Redskins play the Minnesota Vikings
    MINNEAPOLIS MN, NOVEMBER 2: Native Americans taking part in the protest against the Redskins team name, carry tribal banners outside the stadium that the Washington Redskins will play the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis MN, November 2, 2014 (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
  • Washington Redskins v Minnesota Vikings
    MINNEAPOLIS, MN - NOVEMBER 2: People march to TCF Bank Stadium to protest against the mascot for the Washington Redskins before the game against the Minnesota Vikings on November 2, 2014 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Opponents of the Redskins name believe it's a slur that mocks Native American culture and they want the team to change it. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)

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