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List of birds


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_birds
Updated: 2017-07-29T19:54Z
King penguins
Ostriches

This page lists living orders and families of birds. The links below should then lead to family accounts and hence to individual species.

Taxonomy is very fluid in the age of DNA analysis, so comments are made where appropriate, and all numbers are approximate. In particular see Sibley-Ahlquist taxonomy for a very different classification.

Phylogeny

Cladogram of modern bird relationships based on Jarvis, E.D. et al. (2014)[1] with some clade names after Yury, T. et al. (2013).[2]

Aves

Palaeognathae (ratites etc.)


Neognathae

Galloanserae (ducks, chickens, etc.)


Neoaves
Columbea

Mirandornithes (flamingos and grebes)




Columbidae (pigeons)




Mesitornithidae (mesites)



Pteroclididae (sandgrouses)





Passerea


Cypselomorphae (hummingbirds, swifts)




Cuculidae (cuckoos)




Otididae (bustards)



Musophagidae (turacos)








Opisthocomidae (hoatzin)




Gruiformes (rails and cranes)



Charadriiformes (shorebirds)







Aequornithes (loons, penguins, herons, pelicans, storks, etc)




Eurypygiformes (sunbittern, kagu)



Phaethontidae (tropicbirds)




Telluraves
Afroaves
Accipitrimorphae

Cathartidae (condors and New World vultures)



Accipitriformes (hawks, eagles, vultures etc.)





Strigiformes (owls)




Coliidae (mousebirds)


Eucavitaves

Leptosomatidae (cuckoo roller)


Cavitaves

Trogonidae (trogons)


Picocoraciae

Bucerotiformes (hornbills, hoopoe and wood hoopoes)




Coraciformes (kingfishers etc.)



Piciformes (woodpeckers etc.)









Australaves

Cariamidae (seriemas)


Eufalconimorphae

Falconidae (falcons)


Psittacopasserae

Psittaciformes (parrots)



Passeriformes (songbirds and kin)












Paleognathae

The flightless and mostly giant Struthioniformes lack a keeled sternum and are collectively known as ratites. Together with the Tinamiformes, they form the Paleognathae or "old jaws", one of the two evolutionary superorders.

Struthioniformes

Greater rhea pair

Africa; 2 species.

Notopalaeognathae

Rheiformes

South America; 2 species.

Tinamiformes

South America; 45 species.

Novaeratitae

Casuariiformes

Australasia; 4 species.

Apterygiformes

Australasia; 5 species.

Neognathae

Nearly all living birds belong to the superorder of Neognathae or "new jaws". With their keels, unlike the ratites, they are known as carinatae. The passerines alone account for well over 5000 species. In total there are almost 8640 species of birds worldwide.

Galloanserae

Anseriformes

Worldwide; 150 species.

Galliformes

Australian Brush turkey

Worldwide; 250 species.

Neoaves

Columbea

Mirandornithes
Podicipediformes

Worldwide; 19 species

Phoenicopteriformes

Worldwide; 6 species.

Columbimorphae
Columbiformes

Worldwide; 300 species.

Pteroclidiformes

Africa, Europe, Asia; 16 species

Mesitornithiformes

Madagascar; 3 species

Passerea

Caprimulgiformes

Worldwide; 500 species.

Otidimorphae
Cuculiformes

Worldwide; 126 species.

Musophagiformes

Africa; 23 species.

Otidiformes

Africa and Eurasia; 27 species

Opisthocomiformes

South America; 1 species.

Cursorimorphae
Gruiformes

Worldwide; 164 species.

Charadriiformes

Worldwide; 350 species

Eurypygiformes

Neotropics and New Caledonia; 2 species.

Phaethontiformes

Oceanic; 3 species.

Gaviiformes

North America, Eurasia; 5 species.

Sphenisciformes

Antarctic and southern waters; 17 species.

Procellariiformes

Pan-oceanic; 120 species.

Ciconiiformes

Worldwide; 19 species.

Pelecaniformes

Worldwide; 108 species.

Suliformes

Worldwide; 59 species.

Accipitriformes

Worldwide; 200 species.

Strigiformes

Worldwide; 130 species.

Coliiformes

Sub-Saharan Africa; 6 species.

Trogoniformes

Sub-Saharan Africa, Americas, Asia; 35 species.

Coraciiformes

Worldwide; 144 species.

Bucerotiformes

Old World, New Guinea; 64 species.

Leptosomatiformes

Madagascar; 1 species.

Piciformes

Worldwide except Australasia; 400 species.

Cariamiformes

South America; 2 species.

Falconiformes

Worldwide; 60 species.

Psittaciformes

Pan-tropical, southern temperate zones; 330 species.

Passeriformes

Worldwide; 5000 species.

Simplified classification

See also

For regions smaller than continents see:

References

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