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Timeline of the presidency of Ronald Reagan


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_the_presidency_of_Ronald_Reagan
Updated: 2017-09-07T18:25Z

The presidency of Ronald Reagan began on January 20, 1981 when Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as President of the United States, and ended on January 20, 1989.

1981

January

  • January 20 — President Ronald Reagan and Vice President George H. W. Bush take the Oath of Office.[1] The Iran hostage crisis ends minutes after the swearing-in with the release of the 52 Americans held hostage for the past 444 days.[2] Reagan is notified of the release in his first presidential national security briefing and announces the release during a luncheon following his inauguration on Capitol Hill.[3] Reagan, in his first official act as President and less than hour after being sworn-in, imposes a hiring freeze which President Reagan says will inevitably lead to reduction of a notable quantity in the federal work force and he himself will permit rare exemptions when vital to maintaining services.[4]
  • January 21 - The cabinet of the Reagan administration meets for the first time officially, during which President Reagan declares his priorities will be reduction of the government's size and controlling the federal budget. President Reagan attends the swearing-in of 39 senior White House aides; President Reagan tells the aides to make decisions with the intent of what is good for Americans instead of what may land another position for them. President Reagan speaks with former President Carter ahead of the latter arriving in West Germany.[5] Reagan administration officials state there will be several days worth of examinations made on the negotiations of the Iran hostage crisis.[6]
  • January 22 - President Reagan releases a memo to federal government and agency heads ordering a travel reduction by 15%, an outside professional services cut by 5%, and a furniture and other equipment purchase moratorium.[7] Alexander Haig is sworn in as the 59th United States Secretary of State.[8]
  • January 23 - James Edwards is sworn in as the 3rd United States Secretary of Energy.
  • January 25 - President Reagan spends an hour meeting with families of hostages in the Iran hostage crisis, not permitting television or radio coverage. Reagan addresses the families and denies he will be attending the reunion of the hostages and their family members: "You don't need any outsiders. This is a moment for you and them."[9]
  • January 28 - Secretary of Energy Edwards tells reporters that he doubts the prices of gas will be increased much by the immediate deconstruction, though concedes prices could increase by 3 to 5 cents per gallon.[10]
  • January 29 - Reagan holds his first presidential press conference, during which he critiques the Soviet Union as having leaders that "reserve the right to commit any crime, to lie, to cheat" in a sought revolution.[11]
  • January 30 - The White House announces that President Reagan has placed the entirety of his assets barring his two homes into a blind trust for the purpose of avoiding financial compensation for his choices during his tenure in office.[12] Though State Department official William J. Dyess does not confirm the existence of a letter by Secretary of State Haig warning the Soviet Union intervention in Poland could strain its relations with the US, another official validates.[13]

February

  • February 1 - White House Chief of Staff James Baker says the Reagan administration inherited the worst economy in 50 years, that it will be the number one "priority of the administration" and that President Reagan will explain the economy in a televised speech in four days during an appearance on Face the Nation.[14] The Soviet press accuse President Reagan of a "lies and hypocrisy" campaign regarding terrorist support from Kremlin.[15]
  • February 2 - President Reagan is interviewed by five publications in the Oval Office, asserting the Carter administration was wrong for negotiating with Iran during the hostage crisis.[16] Sources report President Reagan is considering 1982's fiscal year having a budget cut of between 30 and 40 million.[17]
  • February 3 - Raymond Donovan is confirmed as United States Secretary of Labor.[18] Secretary of Defense Weinberger holds the first news conference at the Pentagon since taking office, stating his consideration of the deployment of the nuclear warhead.[19]
  • February 4 - President Reagan announces the nomination of Seeley Lodwick to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for International Affairs and Commodity Program and the appointments of Stephen M. Studdert as Special Assistant to the President and Director of the Advance Office and Robert B. Carleson as Special Assistant to the President for Policy Development.[20]
  • February 5 - President Reagan has a televised address, saying in part that the US is in risk of "economic calamity" that can only be prevented with Congress adopting the administration's tax and spending cuts as well as regulatory reform.[21]
  • February 6 - The Senate approves a bill by President Reagan giving federal borrowing a raise by 985 billion USD.[22]
  • February 7 - President Reagan issues a memorandum on the budget for the 1982 fiscal year.[23]
  • February 9 - Secretary of Transportation Lewis chooses to seek a one-year postponing of the passenger restraint rule.[24]
  • February 10 - Department of Justice officials detail policies that will be implemented with the passing of a legislative proposal including a tighter bail law, forming new ways to help crime victims, and federal jurisdictions being developed over crimes that are traditionally handled by authorities of the state.[25]
  • February 11 - Chief State Department spokesman William Dyess reports that the Reagan administration is "deeply concerned" with news that Israel wanting to make new settlements by closing off land on the West Bank.[26] White House officials say the Reagan administration is composing a proposal shifting states to being responsible for the majority of funding for welfare, housing, healthcare, and food programs instead of the federal government.[27]
  • February 23 - President Reagan nominates Emanuel S. Savas for Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.[28]
  • February 24 - President Reagan reports the response to the economic program of the administration has been "enormously endearing" and answers questions during a White House briefing.[29] President Reagan sends a message to Congress calling for their adherence to the Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976 and the agreement between the US and Norway on international fishery.[30]
  • February 26 - President Reagan sends a letter to Administrator of Veteran Affairs Max Cleland in acceptance of the latter's resignation.[31]
  • February 27 - President Reagan announces his appointment of Wendy H. Borcherdt for Associate Director of Presidential Personnel.[32]
  • February 28 - President Reagan nominates Gerald P. Carmen for Administrator of General Services.[33]

March

  • March 3 - President Reagan announces he does not believe there will be a need to send American troops into El Salvador and vows the continued pursuit of diplomacy to ensure the US does not stop involvement and allow "this hemisphere to be invaded by outside forces."[34]
  • March 5 - President Reagan says the federal government will contribute 1 million USD to Atlanta in response to the 21 black children that either disappeared or were murdered.[35] The House Budget Committee charges President Reagan with having overlooked misused dollars numbering in the billions that need to be eliminated ahead of Congress doing so to programs that are of worth.[36]
  • March 6 - President Reagan announces his intent for a federal payroll reduction of 63,000 employees by the end of 1983.[37]
  • March 9 - President Reagan signs a budget cut package in the Rose Garden of the White House. The package includes 300 federal programs to reduce government spending by 6.4 billion USD and the fiscal year 1982's spending by 48.6 billion USD.[38]
  • March 14 - President Reagan gives an address in New York City in the early afternoon.[39] Reagan gives a public statement on the Westway Highway Project.[40]
  • March 16 - President Reagan gives a public statement on St. Patrick's Day.[41] President Reagan gives an address to Associated General Contractors of America members during a reception appearance.[42]
  • March 17 - President Reagan speaks at the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture Dinner.[43]
  • March 18 - Secretary of State Haig says Central America is in the process of being aimed for takeover by the world communist movement.[44]
  • March 19 - Reagan administration sources report will send a "mild signal" requesting Japan voluntarily do away with their automobile exports.[45]
  • March 20 - President Reagan gives a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference Dinner in the Grand Ballroom at the Mayflower Hotel in the evening hours.[46]
  • March 21 - President Reagan speaks briefly at the East Room Reception for Performers in and Sponsors of the Ford's Theatre Benefit Gala in the afternoon.[47]
  • March 23 - President Reagan sends a message to Congress in regards to the impact of new military facilities in communities.[48]
  • March 24 - Press Secretary Brady reports that President Reagan has chosen to have Vice President Bush chair the crisis management team of the administration.[49]
  • March 26 - In the later hours of the day, the Reagan administration states the possible intervention of the Soviet Union in the upcoming labor strike in Poland.[50]
  • March 27 - Secretary of Stated Haig says there is a "very dangerous" situation in Poland, predicting the weekend may be important, and that the US is considering giving further aid to Poland during a breakfast with reporters.[51]
  • March 28 - President Reagan announces the nominations of Antonio Monroig for Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, William A. Niskanen, Jr. for membership on the Council of Economic Advisers, James G. Watt for Chairman of the Water Resources Council, and Alex Kozinski for Special Counsel of the Merit Systems Protection Board.[52]
  • March 29 - Secretary of State Haig says that he is optimistic that Poland will avoid a major crisis due to moderate influence but notes "the situation is still very, very tense."[53]
  • March 30Attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan
  • March 31 - President Reagan resumes his official duties. He meets with Vice President Bush and three top aides from the White House. During breakfast, Reagan signs a bill supporting dairy-price.[54] Vice President Bush says to reporters that he has briefly met with President Reagan and reports the latter's condition as "very well."[55]

April

  • April 1 - In response to the assassination attempt, the Illinois State Senate approves a bill outlawing handguns being sold or possessed, with offenders of the law being eligible to six years of prison if convicted.[56]
  • April 2 - Secretary of Defense Weinberger says steps being taken by the US are the direct result of the Soviet Union taking steps to increase the chances of its Poland invasion.[57]
  • April 3 - President Reagan has his temperature increase to 102 before dropping to an almost normal degree. Benjamin Aaron describes it as a setback though a regular continuation of his injuries from the assassination attempt.[58]
  • April 4 - Egyptian and Western sources say Secretary of State Haig has told his Egyptian hosts that he could have prematurely ceased his Mideast trip due to Poland having increased in tension.[59]
  • April 5 - President Reagan meets with Vernon Jordan. President Reagan is reported to have run an intermittent temperature during the day and in his injured lung, doctors are said to have found particle traces.[60]
  • April 7 - The House Budget Committee rejects the Reagan administration's budget proposal in favor of an alternative by Democrats with less spending on defense and more on social programs. Vice President Bush says the administration is prepared to "have some battles on the House side".[61]
  • April 8 - Secretary of State Haig says Kremlin will gain "troubled waters in which to fish" should there be no peace agreement between Arabs and Israelis.[62] Dr. Dennis O'Leary says that President Reagan will likely return to the White House in two days and will have fully recovered "within four months."[63]
  • April 9 - Reagan releases a statement on the death of Omar Bradley.[64]
  • April 10 - Dr. O'Leary says that President Reagan will be released from Washington University Hospital during the weekend.[65] Press Secretary Brady is reported to possibly suffer no permanent disabilities and eventually return to work amid problems on the left side of his body.[66]
  • April 11 - President Reagan is released from Washington University Hospital.[67]
  • April 13 - Secretary of State Haig awards the Valor Award of the State Department to 54 former American Iran hostages.[68]
  • April 14 - Deputy White House press secretary Larry Speakes says members of the Reagan administration hope to have conversations with Senators William Armstrong, Steven Symms, and Charles Grassley, the three Republican senators that voted against the budget blueprint by President Reagan.[69]
  • April 15 - President Reagan issues his first presidential pardons toward W. Mark Felt and Edward S. Millar.[70]
  • April 16 - President Reagan promises to protect whistleblowers of the ongoing instances of fraud and waste in the federal bureaucracy.[71]
  • April 23 - President Reagan orders 25 billion USD be collected from individuals who owe the government and have yet to pay via an executive order issuing the involvement of each department in constructing a plan to obtains the funds and holding a person accountable for the program.[72]

May

File:President Reagan Presents Medals - GPN-2000-001679.jpg
President Ronald Reagan presents astronaut John Young with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor as well as NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Astronaut Robert C. Crippen also received the Distinguished Service Medal and Dr. Alan Lovelace was presented with the President's Citizens Medal, May 1, 1981
  • May 1 - President Reagan has an informal visit with Charles, Prince of Wales at the White House.[73] The federal government announces its decision to cease requirement of disclosure of beer, wine, and liquor ingredients and cites President Reagan's call for an end to regulations that were unnecessary.[74]
  • May 2 - Robert Byrd, the leader of the Democrats in the Senate, confirms he will vote for President Reagan's budget proposal during his weekly meeting with reporters.[75]
  • May 3 - The State Department says the Reagan administration has decided it must take the lead and supply a large portion of troops in creating an international peace-keeping force within Sinai Peninsula between Israel and Egypt.[76]
  • May 4 - Secretary of State Haig says it is the plan of the US to begin negotiating with the Soviet Union for the limiting nuclear weapons in Europe by the end of the year and that President Reagan sent a letter to Soviet Union leader Leonid Brezhnev in response to a letter Brezhnev had sent him two months prior in March.[77] Vice President Bush calls opponents of the Reagan administration's economic program "obstructionists" for thwarting the will of the people while delivering a speech to the American Newspapers Publishers Association.[78] Press Secretary Brady undergoes surgery for a third time after small blood clots were discovered on his right lung during the night hours. Dr. O'Leary says they are not life-threatening.[79] President Reagan requests Israel allow American diplomats more time to work on the Lebanon crisis.[80]
  • May 5 - NATO endorses the Reagan administration's plan to start talks with Soviets by the end of the year.[81] The Senate confirms 7 of President Reagan's 40 foreign policy nominees and a Senate committee approves 7 others for confirmation.[82]
  • May 6 - Secretary of the Treasury Regan says the administration is examining Social Security system changes during a breakfast session with reporters.[83] The Senate Agriculture Committee agrees to a reduction of the maximum income level to receive food stamp rolls.[84] The Reagan administration orders Libyan envoys out of Washington. Dean Fischer, spokesman of the State Department, says the choice was made due to the Libyan "people's bureau" displaying misconduct.[85]
  • May 7 - The Senate Agriculture Committee agrees to making able bodied persons work public service jobs in exchange for food stamps.[86] The House votes 253 to 176 in an approval of President Reagan's fiscal 1982 budget. 63 Democrats joined the 190 Republicans in support of the president.[87]
  • May 8 - The Senate approves a 7.9 billion USD reduction in cost-of-living increases for the following year toward the 44 million Americans receiving government retirement benefits.[88]
  • May 9 - Secretary of State Haig says the Soviet Union is showing signs of "spiritual exhaustion" amid "an extremely gloomy future" which could potentially make it a stronger adversary to the US while addressing the Syracuse University graduating class.[89]
  • May 11 - President Reagan proposes phasing out the current limitations on earning of the retired by three years during a meeting with his Cabinet Council on Human Resources.[90] The Senate votes against proposals to double President Reagan's spending cuts and do away with the 1982 deficit of 48.8 billion USD.[91] The Senate Foreign Relations Committee approves cutting off military aid and withdrawing advisors unless President Reagan says in writing that the Salvadorian government is controlling its armed forces, observing human rights, and progressing on making political reform in a vote of 11 to 1.[92]
  • May 12 - The Reagan administration releases a proposal to slash benefits of those retiring at age 62 and stall the growth in benefits for future retirees as part of a plan to prevent the bankruptcy of the Social Security system.[93] The Senate approves President Reagan's 700.8 billion USD budget proposal for the 1982 fiscal year in a vote of 78 to 20. Senators Lowell Weicker and Gordon Humphrey are the only Republicans to oppose by vote.[94]
  • May 13 - Secretary of Defense Weinberger says he is content with NATO's European members admitting they may have to facilitate US deployments outside of Europe.[95] Press Secretary Brady is reported as being in good condition following a recovery from a slight fever.[96] President Reagan says he will pray for Pope John Paul II after learning of the latter's assassination attempt.[97]
  • May 14 - House and Senate budget writers approve a 695.4 billion USD spending plan compromise. The plan makes way for President Reagan's cuts in taxes and spending.[98]
  • May 18 - Secretary of Defense Weinberger says the US is not balanced with the Soviet Union in terms of nuclear weapons, elaborating that such a difference is "inviting war", and the SALT II treaty is deceased to the US while speaking to a British Broadcaster Corp. interviewer.[99]
  • May 19 - President Reagan meets with Neil Armstrong, John Glenn, Alan Shepard, Gordon Cooper, Wally Schirra, Scott Carpenter, and 35 other astronauts in an Oval Office ceremony, Reagan saying that John Young and Bob Crippen "have made us very proud." Young and Crippen are both bestowed Distinguished Service Metals, and President Reagan gives Young a Congressional Space Medal of Honor.[100] Secretary of Labor Donovan proposes new penalties, including fines of up to 10,000 USD for failure to keep records of payroll and failing to pay minimum wage, for sweatshop employers.[101] The House Ways and Means Committee approves a 9.1 billion USD spending cut in benefit programs, including Social Security, Medicare, and unemployment.[102]
  • May 20 - The Senate votes unanimously to assure "Congress shall not precipitously and unfairly penalize early retires" in a vote of 96 to 0. It is a setback to President Reagan as it goes against his week-old plan to cut Social Security benefits in an attempt to prevent bankruptcy.[103] The House approves the 695.4 billion USD compromise 1982 budget plan in a vote of 244 to 155.[104]
  • May 21 - The Senate approves the outline of the 1982 budget guideline totaling 695.4 billion USD in a vote of 76 to 20.[105]
  • May 23 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Lennie-Marie P. Tolliver as Commissioner on Aging in the Health and Human Resources Department, Rex E. Lee for United States Solicitor General in the Justice Department, and Anthony Muray, Jr. for Superintendent of the Mint of the United States at Philadelphia at the Treasury Department.[106]
  • May 25 - On Memorial Day, President Reagan declares the day one of "prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning in each locality at 11 o'clock in the morning of that day as a time to unite in prayer." Reagan also urges all forms of information media, the entirety of American governors and government officials, and Puerto Rico Commonwealth to take part in his request.[107]
  • May 26 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Jose Manuel Casanova for Inter-American Development Bank Executive Director.[108]
  • May 27 - Deputy Press Secretary Larry Speakes releases a statement saying President Reagan wants Ambassador Habib to return to Washington so the pair can discuss the Middle East. President Reagan is said by Speakes to view the current time as an "appropriate moment to receive firsthand Ambassador Habib's views and to discuss with him the future of his continuing mission in the context of efforts peacefully to resolve the crisis involving events in Lebanon."[109]
  • May 29 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Allen B. Clark, Jr. for the position of Deputy Administrator of Veteran Affairs.[110]
  • May 30 - President Reagan sends a message to Congress requesting a Veterans Education Assistance Program extension.[111]
  • May 31 - President Reagan sends a message to Abdus Sattar on the assassination of Ziaur Rahman the previous day.[112]

June

  • June 1 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Richard Mulberry for Inspector General at the Department of the Interior, and Robert Sherwood Dillon for Ambassador to Lebano.[113] President Reagan issues an executive order to the Military Rules of Evidence of the Manual for Courts-Martial.[114]
  • June 2 - President Reagan sends a message to Congress on the subjects of Romania trade, Hungary, and the People's Republic of China.[115] President Reagan announces his nominations of June Gibbs Brown for Inspector General of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and Robert Boone Hawkins, Jr. for private citizen member, Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations in a two-year term.[116]
  • June 3 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Alton Gold Keel, Jr. for the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force position, and H. Monroe Brown as United States Ambassador to New Zealand while concurrently serving as United States Ambassador to Western Samoa.[117]
  • June 4 - During a talk with reporters, President Reagan says his meeting with Mother Theresa was wonderful, adding, "You can't be in the presence of someone like that without feeling better about the world." President Reagan also says he cannot currently disclose details of his tax plan.[118] President Reagan announces his nominations of Dean E. Fischer for Assistant Secretary of State, and Vernon A. Walters for Ambassador at Large.[119]
  • June 5 - President Reagan meets with Ethel Kennedy, her children, and Senator Ted Kennedy in the Oval Office. President Reagan awards Ethel the Robert F. Kennedy Medal and says her late husband RFK gave "distinguished and dedicated service" to both the federal government and Americans during a ceremony in the Rose Garden.[120]
  • June 7 - Baruch Korff says President Reagan regularly confers with former President Nixon by sending top secret documents to the former president at his residence in New York City during a telephone interview.[121]
  • June 8 - In the morning hours, President Reagan speaks at the South Portico alongside President of Mexico Jose Lopez Portillo. Reagan and Portillo meet in the Yellow Oval Room after the ceremony and later traveled together to Camp David.[122] President Reagan sends a message to Congress detailing the rescissions of the budget.[123]
  • June 9 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Alvin W. Trivelpiece for Director for Office of Energy Research Director in the Department of Energy, Dallas Lynn Peck for Director of the Geological Survey in the Interior Department, and William M. Otter to be Administrator of the Wage and Hour Division for the Labor Department.[124] President Reagan says his communications with President of Mexico Portillo were "frank, they were valuable, and they lead to a closer relationship between our two countries" while speaking to reporters at the North Portico in the afternoon hours.[125]
  • June 10 - President Reagan announces appointments of the White House Fellows for the 1981-82 year.[126]
  • June 11 - Deputy Press Secretary Speakes reports that President Reagan in upcoming meetings with Ambassadors wants them to "to be aware of his commitment and the commitment of the United States to the furtherance of the peace process in that critical region of the world. He wishes the Ambassadors to convey this to their respective governments."[127]
  • June 12 - President Reagan signs a resolution and proclamation declaring July 17, 1981 National P.O.W.-M.I.A. Recognition Day during a Rose Garden ceremony in the afternoon hours.[128]
  • June 13 - President Reagan releases a statement on federal regulations being reduced, saying that when federal regulations are excessive they "limit job opportunities, raise prices, and reduce the incomes of all Americans."[129]
File:Ronald Reagan Charlton Heston.jpg
President Reagan with Charlton Heston at a meeting with the Presidential Task Force on the Arts and Humanities in the White House Cabinet Room, June 15, 1981.
  • June 15 - In a letter to Attorney General Civiletti, noting the Voting Rights Act of 1965 has provisions set to expire within the following year and hoping to complete an assessment to allow Congress's enacting of a bill prior to the expiration, President Reagan says the Voting Rights Act has "made a massive contribution to the achievement of full constitutional and political equality for black Americans."[130]
  • June 16 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Joan M. Clark for Director General of the Foreign Service in the State Department.[131]
  • June 17 - President Reagan signs a Veterans Medicare Bill. Reagan says during the signing that the "legislation is aimed at maintaining the quality of medical care for our veterans."[132]
  • June 18 - President Reagan sends a letter to Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Potter Stewart in which he states he accepts his retirement.[133]
  • June 19 - President Reagan announces his nominations of J. Raymond Bell for membership in the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United States in the Justice Department, Frank H. Conway for membership of the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United States in Department of Justice, L. Ebersole Gaines for Executive Vice President of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation in United States International Development Cooperation Agency, Bevis Longstreth for membership of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Parker W. Borg for United States Ambassador to the Republic of Mali, and Robert Strausz-Hupe for United States Ambassador to the Republic of Turkey.[134]
  • June 22 - In the afternoon, President Reagan speaks at the White House Opening of the "Champions of American Sport" Exhibition in the East Room.[135]
  • June 23 - President Reagan speaks of the Conable-Hance tax program "as an appetizer" ahead of breakfast with Democratic congressmen.[136]

July

  • July 3 - 80 protestors are arrested following a sit down at the White House in response to budget cuts of the Reagan administration as well as its policy toward El Salvador.[137] China warns the US against possibly straining relations between the two by not repealing the Taiwan Relations Act.[138] President Reagan issues a statement on the following day's observance of the Fourth of July.[139]
  • July 6 - President Reagan issues a message to Congress regarding an agreement on nuclear energy between the United States and Egypt.[140]
  • July 7 — President Reagan nominates Sandra Day O'Connor to the U.S. Supreme Court.[141]
File:President Ronald Reagan and Sandra Day O'Connor July 15, 1981.jpg
President Ronald Reagan and his Supreme Court Justice nominee Sandra Day O'Connor at the White House, July 15, 1981.
  • July 15 - President Reagan obtains a promise from Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill for Congress to remain in session until August 7 for further attempts to complete the bills for budget and tax.[142]
  • July 16 - The Justice Department begins collecting records on FBI Director William Casey.[143]
  • July 20 - President Reagan suspends 10 F-16 fighter bomber jets delivery to Israel.[144]
  • July 22 - Secretary of Defense Weinberger says Philip Habib's efforts to bring peace have been setback by Began launching Lebanon military raids.[145]
  • July 23 - President Reagan accepts a plan adjusting automatic tax cuts for inflation each year as part of changes to his tax bill.[146]
  • July 28 - President Reagan releases a message to the Senate regarding a United States-Sweden Supplementary Convention on extradition.[147]
  • July 29 - In a 238 to 195 vote, the House of Representatives approves President Reagan's tax cut bill.[148]
  • July 30 - President Reagan releases a statement on the immigration and refugee policy toward the United States, saying in part, "We shall seek new ways to integrate refugees into our society without nurturing their dependence on welfare."[149]
  • July 31 - President Reagan announces the appointments of Stanton D. Anderson for membership on the Advisory Committee for Trade Negotiations and Henry G. Cisneros for membership on the Presidential Advisory Committee on Federalism, and the nominations of William Courtney Sherman for Deputy Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations with the Ambassador rank and Ronald I. Spiers for United States Ambassador to Pakistan.[150]

August

  • August 3 - President Reagan holds a session of questions and answers with reporters on the subject of the on the Air Traffic Controllers Strike in the Rose Garden during the morning hours.[151]
  • August 4 - President Reagan speaks at the presentation of his receiving unspent fiscal year funds for 1981 from the Agency for International Development in the Rose Garden during the afternoon.[152]
  • August 5 — President Reagan fires 11,345 striking air traffic controllers who ignored an order to return to work under the terms of the Labor Management Relations Act of 1947
  • August 6 - According to administration officials, President Reagan approves the proceeding of production of neutron weapons during a White House meeting.[153]
  • August 7 - Transportation Secretary Drew Lewis notes receiving reports from air traffic workers who claimed to be harassed and were afraid to return to work, saying they can come back to work if the administration is able to confirm the legitimacy of their claims.[154]
  • August 12 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Raymond C. Ewing for the position of United States Ambassador to the Republic of Cyprus.[155]
  • August 13Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981
  • August 14 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Lenora Cole-Alexander for Director of the Women's Bureau in the Department of Labor.[156]
  • August 17 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Michael H. Newlin for United States Ambassador to the Democratic Popular Republic of Algeria.[157]
  • August 18 - President Reagan says he has begun preliminary works for both the 1983 and 1984 budgets after ending a meeting with top advisors on budget and security.[158] President Reagan announces his nominations of Arthur Adair Hartman for United States Ambassador to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and Harry G. Barnes, Jr. for United States Ambassador to India.[159]
  • August 20 - President Reagan delivers a speech aboard the U.S.S. Constellation.[160]
  • August 28 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Malcolm R. Lovell, Jr. for United States Under Secretary of Labor, Frank V. Ortiz, Jr. for United States Ambassador to Peru, and David B. Funderburk for United States Ambassador to the Socialist Republic of Romania.[161]
  • August 29 - President Reagan wishes Press Secretary Brady "a happy 41st birthday" in a public statement and telephones him in private.[162]
  • August 31 - President Reagan sends a message to Congress on federal civilian pay increases.[163]

September

  • September 1 - Reagan administration officials disclose that there will soon be an announcement by the administration on federal employment cuts of 100,000 over a two-year span.[164]
  • September 2 - President Reagan says the Soviet Union will agree to legitimate arms reduction that is verifiable or position themselves to have an arms race "which they can't win" during a Palmer House reception.[165]
  • September 3 - President Reagan delivers an address to the Annual Convention of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners at the McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, noting its centennial in his remarks.[166]
  • September 4 - President Reagan is announced to have asked for Vice President Bush's leadership of the delegation from America in bilateral economic talks between the latter country and Nigeria.[167] President Reagan announces the appointing of Rodney N. Searle to Chairman of the Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission, and the nominations of Jeffrey S. Bragg for Federal Insurance Administrator, Susan Meredith Phillips for Commissioner of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Charles Timothy Hagel for Deputy Administrator of Veterans Affairs, Donald James Quigg for Deputy Commissioner of Patents and Trademarks, Faith Ryan Whittlesey for Ambassador to Switzerland, Joseph Verner Reed, Jr. for United States Ambassador to the Kingdom of Morocco, and Thomas Aranda, Jr. for United States Ambassador to Uruguay.[168]
  • September 16 - President Reagan announces his nominating of C. Everett Koop for Surgeon General of the Public Health Service, and F. Callahan for membership on the National Credit Union Administration.[169]
  • September 17 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Thomas R. Pickering for Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Nigeria, and Rickey Dale James for membership on the Mississippi River Commission.[170]
  • September 18 - President Reagan visits and tours the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum along with his wife, Mexico President Portillo, Canada Prime Minister Trudeau, former France President d'Estaing, and former President and First Lady Ford, and later delivers remarks at the dedication ceremony.[171] President Reagan speaks at the Biennial Convention of the National Federation of Republican Women at the Denver Convention Complex in Denver, Colorado in the afternoon.[172]
  • September 21 — President Reagan meets with 17 private sector organizations at the White House and delivers an address before them briefly touching on his administration's economic plan in the morning.[173] The U.S. Senate confirms O'Connor to the Supreme Court.

October

  • October 1 - President Reagan announces Saudi Arabia will not be allowed by the US to be taken over similarly to Iran during a televised press conference.[174]
  • October 5 - President Reagan delivers a speech at the Annual Meeting of the National Alliance of Business at the Sheraton Washington Hotel.[175] President Reagan announces his designating of the upcoming October 11 as "General Pulaski Memorial Day" in honor of Casimir Pulaski.[176]
  • October 6 - President Reagan issues a public statement on the death of President of Egypt Anwar Sadat, calling the latter "a courageous man whose vision and wisdom brought nations and people together."[177]
  • October 7 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Geoffrey Swaebe for United States Representative to the European Office of the United Nations.[178]
  • October 8 - President Reagan meets with former Presidents Jimmy Carter, Richard Nixon, and Gerald Ford in a small ceremony ahead of their attending the funeral of Anwar Sadat as representatives for the United States. It marks the first time in U.S. history that four presidents were together.[179]
  • October 14 - President Reagan announces his nominations of Evan Griffith Galbraith for United States Ambassador to France, and Francis S. M. Hodsoll for Chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts.[180]
  • October 30 - President Reagan nominates Francis Terry McNamara for Ambassador to the Gabonese Republic and to the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, Benjamin F. Baer for Commissioner of the United States Parole Commission, Warner M. Depuy for Alternate Federal member of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Charles L. Hardwick for membership on the Presidential Advisory Committee on Federalism, ten individuals for the Federal Council on Aging, individuals for positions of chairmanship on the 10 Federal Regional Councils, and Elliot Abrams as Assistant Secretary of State.[181]
  • October 31 - President Reagan nominates Milan D. Bish for the position of Ambassador to Barbados, Commonwealth of Dominica, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda, and Janet McCoy for High Commissioner of the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands.[182]

November

  • November 1 - Officials say the US has been urged by Israel to be aware of a peace plan by the Middle East that Israel turned down.[183]
  • November 2 - President Reagan formally welcomes Hussein of Jordan on the South Lawn of the White House in the morning hours. President Reagan and Hussien meet with Vice President Bush, Secretary of State Haig, Assistant to the President Allen, and United States Ambassador to Jordan Viets in the Oval Office.[184] President Reagan attends a State Dining Room dinner in honor of Hussien, exchanging public comments with the latter during the night hours.[185] President Reagan also announces his nomination of John McKean for the position of Governor of the United States Postal Service.[186]
  • November 3 - Secretary of State Haig accuses National Security Advisor Allen of having run a guerilla campaign against him since the second month of the administration.[187] Senator Joe Biden says the Reagan administration notified Congress of its intent to sell satellite components the day ahead of the sale to ARABSAT.[188]
  • November 9 - Secretary of Treasury Regan announces the Reagan administration has halted plans to ask Congress for tax increases of 3 billion USD.[189]
  • November 10 - President Reagan calls on Americans to "stiffen its spine and not throw in the towel" on the subject of further federal spending cuts during a televised news conference.[190]
File:Donald Lambro interviews Ronald Reagan.jpg
Donald Lambro interviews Ronald Reagan in 1981 in Oval Office, November 16, 1981
  • November 16 - President Reagan removes Arthur S. Flemming as Civil Rights Commission chairman and names Clarence Pendleton as his successor.[191] The Justice Department says it cannot determine if John Hinckley, Jr. contracted brain damage from suicide attempt a few minutes ahead of his arrest.[192]
  • November 18 - Reagan administration officials say they will present their proposal for Europe-based medium range nuclear missiles to be eliminated to the Soviets based in Geneva.[193]
  • November 19 - The White House discloses Edwin Meese meet with the FBI for determining whether there should be any charges applied to Richard Allen for the latter taking a cash agreement of $1,000 USD two weeks ago.[194]
  • November 20 - President Reagan attends the dedication of the Library of Congress James Madison Memorial Building in the morning.[195] President Reagan announces his nominations of Franklin S. Forsberg for United States Ambassabor to Sweden and Herbert R. Lippold, Jr. for membership of the Mississippi River Commission.[196]
  • November 24 - Reagan administration officials says the president's conflict with Congress on the issue of government spending is a mere preview of an upcoming conflict for President Reagan to gain reductions in the 1983 budget he will seek in two months.[197]
  • November 27 - President Reagan announces several nominations, including Clarence E. Hodges for Chief of the Children's Bureau in the Department of Health and Human Services, James N. Broder for membership on the Federal Council on the Aging, and several employees for the National Commission for Employment Policy.[198]
  • November 29 - President Reagan speaks by telephone to the Miami, Florida Plenary Session of the Caribbean and Central America Action Conference while at his California ranch.[199]
  • November 30 - President Reagan states his intent to not abstain "one inch" from his economic plan while speaking at a Republican fundraising cocktail and reception dinner in Cincinnati, Ohio.[200] Vice President Bush meets with President of AfL-CIO Lane Kirkland in the former's White House office as part of an attempt at reconciling with union leaders opposed to the air traffic controllers firing by President Reagan as well as the administration's economic policies.[201]

December

  • December 1 - During a White House Conference on Aging attended by 2,300 delegates, President Reagan says his administration will not "betray those entitled to Social Security benefits".[202] Spokesman David Gergen tells reporters that President Reagan is not presently considering putting air controllers in towers.[203]
  • December 2 - President Reagan announces the appointment of forty-four members of the President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives,[204] and thirteen members on the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.[205] President Reagan also delivers an address to members of the President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives during a luncheon meeting.[206]
  • December 3 - Production of the B-1 bomber is approved by the Senate.[207]
  • December 4 - President Reagan announces the appointments of Kenneth M. Duberstein to be Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs, Richard W. Heldridge for membership on the Board of Directors of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, Bernard J. Lasker and Clyde H. Slease the Board of Visitors of the United States Military Academy, Edward R. Borcherdt, Jr. and Bernard E. Smith, Jr. for membership on the Board of Visitors for the United States Naval Academy, Terrence O'Donnell and Henry B. Sayler for membership of the Board of Visitors for the United States Air Force Academy, Walter Cutler for United States Ambassador to Tunisia, Maurice H. Stans for membership of the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and Walter Gellhorn and Otis M. Smith for membership of the Council of the Administrative Conference of the United States.[208] President Reagan signs the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act of 1982.[209] President Reagan announces his issuing of two executive orders, one "to govern the activities of our intelligence agencies" and another "to reestablish the Intelligence Oversight Board".[210]
  • December 6 - Moammar Khadafy calls President Reagan alongside denials of plotting to assassinate him during an interview with David Brinkley on This Week With David Brinkley. The State Department replies that the US has evidence in regards to his possible plotting of the assassinations of American officials.[211] A spokesman says President Reagan told aides he is awaiting the outcome of Richard V. Allen's inquiry to decide on the latter's return as National Security Advisor.[212]
  • December 7 - President Reagan says he won't "believe a word" from Moammar Khadafy and that the US has evidence and Khadafy is privy to that information during a short meeting with reporters.[213]
  • December 8 - An unnamed government official discloses that the Justice Department has included Richard Allen in an investigation into national security as a result of Allen not listing the names of clients of his consulting firm in a financial disclosure firm.[214]
  • December 10 - President Reagan requests American firms to withdraw 1,500 Libya-based American citizens.[215]
  • December 11 - The Reagan administration gives an estimation that 25% of all Americans receiving social security benefits should lose their payments given a state of not meeting qualifications given their good health.[216]
  • December 12 - President Reagan announces the President's Volunteer Action Awards has been established.[217]
  • December 15 - President Reagan says intervention by the Soviet Union in Poland would "be taken most seriously by all of the Free World" while speaking to newsmen amid an Oval Office picture taking session.[218]
  • December 17 - President Reagan holds his six presidential press conference, during which condemning Poland for "coercion and violation of human rights" and saying the US cannot give economic aid to Poland unless martial law is lifted.[219]
  • December 18 - President Reagan orders the suspension of the U.S.-Israel security agreement as well as the 200 million USD purchase from the Pentagon of Israeli defense-related goods and services.[220]
  • December 21 - White House spokesman Larry Speakes says President Reagan will be urged during the week to increase taxes as a way of quelling a growing deficit in the budget.[221]
  • December 24 - Secretary of State Haig says there will be an immediate collapse of the Poland economy and thereby guarantee further refusal to the regime of martial law there.[222]
  • December 27 - It is announced that Health and Human Services Secretary Schwelker orders that doctors and other health professionals receive a crackdown in the event they have defaulted from student loans.[223]
  • December 28 - Senior administration officials say President Reagan spoke with advisors over the phone while he was in California for the purpose of imposing sanctions against the Soviet Union in response to its purposed connection to Poland's imposition of martial law.[224]
  • December 29 - President Reagan announces his nomination of James Sanderson for Assistant Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and appointing of eleven members to the American Battle Monuments Commission.[225]
  • December 30 - President Reagan announces his choice of four new members to the Board of Directors of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation.[226]

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

January

  • January 2 - A memorandum by President Reagan on the general system of preferences is filed with the Federal Register Office during the afternoon.[243] President Reagan sends a letter to Speaker of the House of Representatives Tip O'Neill about his "intent to withdraw Romania and Nicaragua and suspend Paraguay from the list of beneficiary developing countries under the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) effective 60 days after the date of this letter."[244]
  • January 3 - President Reagan conducts his radio address from the Oval Office of the White House about the fiscal budget for the following year.[245]
  • January 5 - Letters are sent to Speaker O'Neill and Vice President George H. W. Bush for the 1988 budget.[246]
  • January 27 — President Reagan gives his 1987 State of the Union Address
  • January 30 - President Reagan awards Larry Speakes the Presidential Citizen Medal.[247] President Reagan announces his appointments of Charles D. Hobbs for Assistant to the President,[248] and Gary L. Bauer for Assistant to the President for Policy Development.[249]
  • January 31 - President Reagan delivers a radio address regarding the goals of his presidency from the Oval Office during the afternoon.[250]

April

  • April 20 - United States Secretary of the Interior Donald P. Hodel requests that Congress give approval to both oil and gas leasing while recommending the Arctic National Wildfire Refuge.[251] Vice President Bush hosts the annual White House Easter Egg Roll.[252]
  • April 21 - The Senate grants limited immunity to former United States National Security Advisor John Poindexter.[253]
  • April 22 - President Reagan participates in the White House Correspondents' Dinner.[254]
  • April 23 - The Pentagon disputes a prior report that confirming the functioning of the laser and participle beams of the Strategic Defense Initiative would take a decade of research.[255]
  • April 24 - 15 members of the American white supremacist movement are charged by the federal government of violations of civil rights, sedition, and conspiracy.[256]
  • April 25 - President Reagan says Congress members advocating protectionist trade legislation are risking America's prosperity "for the sake of sort term appeal" to acquire popular support during his weekly radio address.[257]

May

  • May 11 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Kenneth Y. Tomlinson for membership on the Board for International Broadcasting for a nearly three-year term.[258]
  • May 12 - President Reagan meets with Republican congressional leaders during the morning hours.[259]
  • May 23 - President Reagan designates May 25 as a national day of mourning for the victims in the USS Stark incident.[260] President Reagan delivers a radio address from Camp David during the early afternoon, speaking on Memorial Day and the deficit of the budget.[261]

June

  • June 11 - President Reagan conducts the forty-first news conference of his presidency at the Hotel Cipriani in Venice, Italy during the afternoon.[262] President Reagan issues a statement expressing regret for "the necessity, temporarily, to withdraw the proposal to sell modified Maverick air-to-ground missiles to Saudi Arabia because of strong congressional opposition."[263] President Reagan delivers an address to the Italian-American conference at the Palazzo Grassi during the afternoon.[264]
  • June 12 — President Reagan gives his "Tear down this wall!" speech
  • June 13 - President Reagan discusses world trade during his radio address from the Oval Office during the afternoon.[265]

July

  • July 1 — President Reagan nominates Robert Bork to the Supreme Court
  • July 16 - President Reagan delivers a speech at the Presentation Ceremony for the All-America Cities Awards in Room 450 of the Old Executive Office Building during the afternoon.[266] President Reagan sends the annual environmental quality report, noting "programs and policies governing environmental protection and natural resource preservation are in need of change" in spite of positive trends within the report.[267] President Reagan signs Executive Order 12603 "in order to increase the number of members of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic".[268]
  • July 17 - President Reagan meets with Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Margaret Thatcher in the Oval Office of the White House, attending a luncheon with her afterward. President Reagan delivers a speech in the South Portico, during which he says he and the prime minister "reviewed the general prospects for peace in the Middle East" and their discussion was "highly successful."[269] President Reagan announces his nomination of Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr. for membership on the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation with a two-year term.[270]
  • July 22McKinney–Vento Homeless Assistance Act
  • July 27 - President Reagan delivers a speech to employees at the Broan Manufacturing Company in Hartford, Wisconsin during the morning.[271] Over an hour later, President Reagan gives a speech to a Rotary Club Luncheon in the Old Settlers Room at the Old Washington Restaurant in West Bend during the afternoon.[272]

October

  • October 1 - President Reagan sends a message to Congress reporting "13 deferrals of budget authority totaling $1,776,737,627."[273] President Reagan announces his choice to nominate Earl E. Gjelde for Under Secretary of the Interior, and Melvin N.A. Peterson for Chief Scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at the Department of Commerce.[274]
  • October 2 - President Reagan signs the Germany-American Day Proclamation.[275] President Reagan announces his nominations, both in the Defense Department, of Robert Clifton Duncan for Director of Defense Research and Engineering, and Fred S. Hoffman for Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs).[276] During an exchange with reporters, President Reagan says he is "going to continue working as hard as I can" to see that Bork is appointed.[277]
  • October 3 - President Reagan delivers a radio address from Camp David on volunteering and in support of Bork's nomination during the afternoon.[278]
  • October 23 — Full Senate rejects Bork as Supreme Court justice

November

  • November 2 - William S. Sessions is sworn in as Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation at the J. Edgar Hoover Building.[279] President Reagan announces the nomination of Chandler L. van Orman for Administrator of the Economic Regulatory Administration at the Department of Energy, and the appointment of T. Kenneth Cribb, Jr. for Governor of the Board of Governors of the American National Red Cross.[280]
  • November 3 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Ann McLaughlin for United States Secretary of Labor.[281]
  • November 4 - A recording of President Reagan speaking about relations between the US and the Soviet Union, produced the previous day in the Oval Office of the White House, is played during the morning.[282] President Reagan announces his nominations of April Catherine Glaspie for Ambassador to the Republic of Iraq, and David C. Miller, Jr. for membership on the Board of Directors of the African Development Foundation.[283] President Reagan announces the appointment of Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. for Assistant to the President.[284] President Reagan states his intent to lift part of his sanctions made on Japanese products due to "improved Japanese compliance with the 1986 U.S.-Japan semiconductor agreement".[285]
  • November 5 - President Reagan announces his nomination of Frank C. Carlucci for United States Secretary of Defense.[286]
  • November 30 — President Reagan nominates Anthony Kennedy to the Supreme Court

December

  • December 1 - President Reagan states he has nominated Leonard H.O. Spearman, Sr. for United States Ambassador to the Republic of Rwanda.[287] President Reagan delivers a speech and answers questions in the Veterans' Memorial Coliseum at the Duval County public schools in Jacksonville, Florida.[288]
  • December 2 - President Reagan sends a letter to Speaker of the House O'Neill and Vice President Bush on the Soviet Union not complying with the Arms Control Agreements.[289] President Reagan sends Congress two versions of the Public Law 99 - 145 mandate of the annual report on the choice of Soviet Union to not comply with the Arms Control Agreements.[290]
  • December 3 - James H. Burnley IV is sworn in as the 9th United States Secretary of Transportation.[291] President Reagan announces his nominations of T.S. Ary for Director of the Bureau of Mines at the Department of the Interior, Wendy Lee Gramm for Commissioner of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and E. Phillips for membership on the Federal Trade Commission, and his appointments of Warren Lloyd Miller for membership on the District of Columbia Law Revision Commission, and Beny J. Primm for membership on the White House Conference for a Drug Free America.[292]
  • December 4 - President Reagan announces the nomination of Mark Sullivan III for General Counsel for the Department of the Treasury.[293]
  • December 5 - President Reagan delivers a radio address from the Oval Office on the topics of reducing the deficit and relations between the US and Soviet Union.[294] President Reagan issues a proclamation designating the upcoming December 17 as "Wright Brothers Day", reasoning that "Wilbur and Orville Wright ushered in the age of modern aviation with an accomplishment unprecedented in history".[295]
  • December 7 - President Reagan answers questions about Gorbachev from reporters while in the Roosevelt Room of the White House during the afternoon.[296] President Reagan signs the Sentencing Act of 1987, amending the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984.[297]
  • December 8 — President Reagan signs the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with USSR head of state Mikhail Gorbachev
  • December 8–10 — President Reagan attends the Washington Summit
  • December 11 - President Reagan speaks and answers questions from news editors and broadcasters in the Old Executive Office Building's Room 450 during the afternoon.[298] President Reagan announces the nominations of Hershey Gold for membership on the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, Susan Wing for membership on the Federal Communications Commission, J. Wade Gilley for membership on the National Advisory Council on Educational Research and Improvement, Warren Keating Hendriks, Jr. for membership on the Advisory Committee on Federal Pay, Gloria Sherwood for membership on the Federal Council on the Aging, and Frank G. Zarb for Director of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation.[299]
  • December 12 - President Reagan delivers a radio address from Camp David on the US's relations with the Soviet Union during the afternoon.[300]
  • December 14 - President Reagan gives a speech on NATO to the Board of Trustees of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in the Wadsworth Room at the International Club during the morning.[301] President Reagan announces the appointments of Charles Nicholas Rostow for Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Myron J. Mintz to be a member of the Advisory Committee to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, the nominations of Jay Kenneth Katzen for membership on the Board of Directors of the African Development Foundation and Jose M. Deetjen for membership on the Board of Directors of the Inter-American Foundation, and the designation of Murray P. Hayutin for Chairman of the Advisory Committee to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.[302]
  • December 21 - President Reagan announces the nominations J. Daniel Howard for Assistant Secretary of Defense and C. Anson Franklin for Assistant Secretary of Energy.[303]
  • December 22 - President Reagan signs Executive Order 12618, amending Executive Order 12591 with a new section.[304]
  • December 23 - President Reagan issues proclamations for the upcoming 1988 to be known as the "Year of New Sweden",[305] January 8 of the following year being designated as "National Skiing Day",[306] and January 28 to be known as the "National Day of Excellence".[307]
  • December 24 - President Reagan signs Executive Order 12620, a delegation of authority.[308] President Reagan signs a proclamation in regards to the European Community to the United States, "imposing and temporarily suspending duties on approximately $100 million worth" of their exports.[309]
  • December 26 - A radio broadcast, recorded by President Reagan three days earlier in the Roosevelt Room, is released, during which the president calls volunteering and selfless acts.[310]
  • December 27 - President Reagan releases a statement noting the eighth anniversary of the invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union.[311]
  • December 29 - President Reagan signs Executive Order 12621, an amendment of Section 2(b) of the prior month's Executive Order 12614 to change the reading to "The Task Force shall submit its recommendations to the President no later than January 8, 1988."[312]
  • December 31 - President Reagan issues Executive Order 12622, adjusting payment and allowance rates.[313] The law is said to "provide, as proposed by the administration, a 4.2-percent cost-of-living increase in the monthly benefit checks of over 2.2 million veterans with service-connected disabilities and their dependents and to about 310,000 surviving spouses and children of veterans whose deaths were service-connected."[314]

1988

1989

References

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External links

U.S. presidential administration timelines
Preceded by
Carter
Reagan presidency
1981–1989
Succeeded by
G. H. W. Bush
  1. ^ Neal, Steve (January 21, 1981). "Reagan takes oath". Chicago Tribune. 
  2. ^ "Hostages safe!". Chicago Tribune. January 21, 1981. 
  3. ^ Maclean, John. "Delay lets Reagan, not Carter, announce the good news". Chicago Tribune. 
  4. ^ "Reagan imposes U.S. hiring freeze in his first official act". Chicago Tribune. January 20, 1981. 
  5. ^ Neal, Steve (January 22, 1981). "Reagan goes right to work on 1st day". Chicago Tribune. 
  6. ^ Maclean, John (January 21, 1981). "Reagan to study hostage pact before making judgement". Chicago Tribune. 
  7. ^ Neal, Steve. "President orders spending slashed". Chicago Tribune. 
  8. ^ "Haig sworn in, vows firm foreign policy". Chicago Tribune. 
  9. ^ "Tearful Reagan hails families". Chicago Tribune. January 25, 1981. 
  10. ^ Worsham, James (January 28, 1981). "Reagan minimizes oil decontrol cost". Chicago Tribune. 
  11. ^ Neal, Steve (January 30, 1981). "Reagan Rips Russ leaders". Chicago Tribune. 
  12. ^ "Reagan puts cash assets of $740,000 in blind trust". Chicago Tribune. January 31, 1981. 
  13. ^ "Haig warns Russ about Polish move". January 31, 1981. 
  14. ^ "Reagan aide sees no quick fix on the economy". Chicago Tribune. February 2, 1981. 
  15. ^ "Moscow lashes out at Reagan". Chicago Tribune. February 2, 1981. 
  16. ^ Neal, Steve (February 3, 1981). "Reagan hits Carter on Iran". Chicago Tribune. 
  17. ^ Neikirk, Bill (February 3, 1981). "1982 social programs face trims". Chicago Tribune. 
  18. ^ "Donovan is OKd; Cabinet complete". Chicago Tribune. February 4, 1981. 
  19. ^ "Weinberger leans toward neutron bomb". Chicago Tribune. February 4, 1981. 
  20. ^ Nominations & Appointments, February 4, 1981
  21. ^ "President wants tax, budget cuts". Chicago Tribune. February 6, 1981. 
  22. ^ "GOP helps Senate OK new debt lid". Chicago Tribune. February 7, 1981. 
  23. ^ Memorandum on the Fiscal Year 1982 Budget (February 7, 1981)
  24. ^ "U.S. moves to delay automatic seat belt rule by a year". Chicago Tribune. February 10, 1981. 
  25. ^ "Justice Department seeking new ways to fight violent crime". Chicago Tribune. February 11, 1981. 
  26. ^ "U.S. strongly criticizes Israeli settlements policy". Chicago Tribune. February 12, 1981. 
  27. ^ "Reagan plans state control over welfare". Chicago Tribune. February 13, 1981. 
  28. ^ Nomination of Emanuel S. Savas To Be an Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (February 23, 1981)
  29. ^ Remarks During a White House Briefing on the Program for Economic Recovery (February 24, 1981)
  30. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting the United States-Norway Fishery Agreement (February 24, 1981)
  31. ^ Letter Accepting the Resignation of Max Cleland as Administrator of Veterans Affairs (February 26, 1981)
  32. ^ Appointment of Wendy H. Borcherdt as Associate Director of Presidential Personnel (February 27, 1981)
  33. ^ Nomination of Gerald P. Carmen To Be Administrator of General Services (February 28, 1981)
  34. ^ "Reagan: No combat role in Salvador". Chicago Tribune. March 4, 1981. 
  35. ^ "U.S. helps Atlanta fight child terror". Chicago Tribune. March 6, 1981. 
  36. ^ "Trim waste, not aid - panel chief". Chicago Tribune. March 6, 1981. 
  37. ^ Neal, Steve. "Reagan to cut U.S. payroll by 63,000". Chicago Tribune. 
  38. ^ "Reagan spending-cut package wrapped up". Chicago Tribune. March 10, 1981. 
  39. ^ Remarks Outside Angelo's Restaurant in New York, New York (March 14, 1981)
  40. ^ Statement on the Westway Highway Project in New York, New York (March 14, 1981)
  41. ^ Message on the Observance of St. Patrick's Day, 1981 (March 16, 1981)
  42. ^ Remarks at a Reception for Members of the Associated General Contractors of America (March 16, 1981)
  43. ^ Remarks at the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture Dinner Honoring Secretary of Agriculture Block (March 17, 1981)
  44. ^ "Central America on communist 'hit list,' Haig warns Congress". Chicago Tribune. March 19, 1981. 
  45. ^ "U.S. to pressure Japanese on cars". Chicago Tribune. March 20, 1981. 
  46. ^ Remarks at the Conservative Political Action Conference Dinner (March 20, 1981)
  47. ^ Remarks at a White House Reception for Performers in and Sponsors of the Ford's Theatre Benefit Gala (March 21, 1981)
  48. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting a Report on the Community Impact of New Military Facilities (March 23, 1981)
  49. ^ Statement by the Press Secretary on Foreign and Domestic Crisis Management (March 24, 1981)
  50. ^ "Polish situation serious - Reagan". Chicago Tribune. March 27, 1981. 
  51. ^ "Soviets warned on invasion". Chicago Tribune. March 28, 1981. 
  52. ^ Nominations, March 28, 1981
  53. ^ "Haig sees 'good signs' Polish will solve crisis". -Chicago Tribune. March 29, 1981. 
  54. ^ Neal, Steve (April 1, 1981). "Reagan told about Brady; 'Oh, damn, oh, damn'". Chicago Tribune. 
  55. ^ Exchange Between the Vice President and Reporters on the President's Recovery Following the Attempted Assassination (March 31, 1981)
  56. ^ "State Senate panel OKs handgun ban". Chicago Tribune. April 2, 1981. 
  57. ^ "Poland invasion peril is growing: U.S.". Chicago Tribune. April 3, 1981. 
  58. ^ Collin, Dorothy. "Reagan back near normal after running fever of 102". Chicago Tribune. 
  59. ^ "Polish crisis may end Haig's Mideast talks". Chicago Tribune. April 5, 1981. 
  60. ^ "Reagan still has fever, particles in lung". Chicago Tribune. April 6, 1981. 
  61. ^ "Panel rejects Reagan budget". Chicago Tribune. April 8, 1981. 
  62. ^ "Concession to Arabs seen in statement". Chicago Tribune. April 9, 1981. 
  63. ^ "Reagan likely to go home this weekend". Chicago Tribune. April 7, 1981. 
  64. ^ "Reagan hails Bradley for 'humility, courage'". Chicago Tribune. April 10, 1981. 
  65. ^ "Reagan going home from hospital, this weekend, but parley delayed". Chicago Tribune. April 11, 1981. 
  66. ^ Rowley, Storer (April 11, 1981). "The Brady 'miracle'". Chicago Tribune. 
  67. ^ Neal, Steve (April 12, 1981). "Reagan leaves hospital". Chicago Tribune. 
  68. ^ "Ex-hostages given award for Valor". Chicago Tribune. April 14, 1981. 
  69. ^ "Reagan hopes to woo 3 foes of budget plan". Chicago Tribune. April 14, 1981. 
  70. ^ "Reagan pardons 2 ex-FBI officials". Chicago Tribune. April 16, 1981. 
  71. ^ Coates, James. "I'll protect waste informers: Reagan". Chicago Tribune. 
  72. ^ Siddon, Arthur. "Reagan orders crackdown on U.S. deadbeats". Chicago Tribune. 
  73. ^ "Reagan, prince talk horses". Chicago Tribune. May 2, 1981. 
  74. ^ "Liquor firm win rules fight". Chicago Tribune. May 2, 1981. 
  75. ^ "Senate Democratic leader says he'll back Reagan's budget plan". Chicago Tribune. May 3, 1981. 
  76. ^ "U.S. to police Egypt-Israel peace in Sinai". Chicago Tribune. May 4, 1981. 
  77. ^ "Haig plans for Soviet talks". Chicago Tribune. May 5, 1981. 
  78. ^ "Bush calls Reagan foes obstructionists". Chicago Tribune. April 5, 1981. 
  79. ^ "Brady undergoes operation for blood clots in lungs". Chicago Tribune. May 5, 1981. 
  80. ^ Broder, Jonathan (May 5, 1981). "Reagan urges patience by Israel over missiles". Chicago Tribune. 
  81. ^ "NATO backs U.S.-Soviet talk". Chicago Tribune. May 6, 1981. 
  82. ^ "Nominee logjam eases in Senate". Chicago Tribune. May 6, 1981. 
  83. ^ Neikirk, Bill (May 7, 1981). "Regan warns on Social Security". Chicago Tribune. 
  84. ^ "Senate panel votes cut in food-stamp list". Chicago Tribune. May 7, 1981. 
  85. ^ "U.S. hits Libya terrorism, expels all envoys". Chicago Tribune. May 7, 1981. 
  86. ^ "Senate panels OKs 'workfare'". Chicago Tribune. May 8, 1981. 
  87. ^ Siddon, Arthur (May 8, 1981). "House OKs Reagan budget". Chicago Tribune. 
  88. ^ "Senate votes to curb pension hikes". Chicago Tribune. May 9, 1981. 
  89. ^ "Haig says Soviet Union is facing a 'gloomy future'". Chicago Tribune. May 10, 1981. 
  90. ^ Neikirk, Bill (May 12, 1981). "Slash benefits for early retirement, Reagan urges". Chicago Tribune. 
  91. ^ "Senate defeats 2 bids to alter Reagan's cuts". Chicago Tribune. May 12, 1981. 
  92. ^ "Panel OKs Salvador aid curb". Chicago Tribune. May 12, 1981. 
  93. ^ Neikirk, Bill (May 13, 1981). "14-point plan to keep Social Security afloat". Chicago Tribune. 
  94. ^ "Reagan budget breezes to 78-20 victory in Senate". Chicago Tribune. May 13, 1981. 
  95. ^ "Weinberger hails NATO response". Chicago Tribune. May 14, 1981. 
  96. ^ "Brady condition good as slight fever drops". Chicago Tribune. May 14, 1981. 
  97. ^ "Assassin target Reagan prays for wounded Pope". Chicago Tribune. May 14, 1981. 
  98. ^ "Spending plan sees $37.6 billion deficit". Chicago Tribune. May 15, 1981. 
  99. ^ "Weinberger says arms gap is inviting war". Chicago Tribune. May 19, 1981. 
  100. ^ "Reagan, astronauts salute Colombia crew". Chicago Tribune. May 20, 1981. 
  101. ^ "Donovan urges new penalties in crackdown on 'sweatshops'". Chicago Tribune. May 20, 1981. 
  102. ^ "Panel OKs $9.1 billion in benefit program cuts". Chicago Tribune. May 20, 1981. 
  103. ^ "Senate resolution opposes pension cuts". Chicago Tribune. May 21, 1981. 
  104. ^ "House Oks budget; Senate delays vote". Chicago Tribune. May 21, 1981. 
  105. ^ "Senate OKs Reagan austerity budget plan". Chicago Tribune. May 22, 1981. 
  106. ^ Nominations, May 23, 1981
  107. ^ Proclamation 4842—Memorial Day, May 25, 1981
  108. ^ Nomination of Jose Manuel Casanova To Be Executive Director of the Inter-American Development Bank (May 26, 1981)
  109. ^ Statement by Deputy Press Secretary Larry M. Speakes on Consultations With Ambassador Habib Concerning the Situation in Lebanon (May 27, 1981)
  110. ^ Nomination of Allen B. Clark, Jr., To Be Deputy Administrator of Veterans Affairs (May 29, 1981)
  111. ^ Message to the Congress Recommending Extension of the Veterans Education Assistance Program (May 30, 1981)
  112. ^ Message to Acting President Abdus Sattar of Bangladesh on the Death of President Ziaur Rahman (May 31, 1981)
  113. ^ Nominations, June 1, 1981
  114. ^ Executive Order 12306 -- Amendments to the Manual for Courts-Martial, United States, 1969 (Revised Edition) (June 1, 1981)
  115. ^ Message to the Congress on Trade With Romania, Hungary, and the People's Republic of China (June 2, 1981)
  116. ^ Nominations & Appointments, June 2, 1981
  117. ^ Nominations, June 3, 1981
  118. ^ Exchange With Reporters Following a Luncheon With Mother Teresa of Calcutta (June 4, 1981)
  119. ^ Nominations, June 4, 1981
  120. ^ Remarks on Presenting the Robert F. Kennedy Medal to Mrs. Kennedy (June 5, 1981)
  121. ^ "Reagan consults Nixon, rabbi says". Chicago Tribune. June 8, 1981. 
  122. ^ Remarks at the Welcoming Ceremony for President Jose Lopez Portillo of Mexico (June 8, 1981)
  123. ^ Message to the Congress Reporting Budget Rescissions (June 8, 1981)
  124. ^ Nominations, June 9, 1981
  125. ^ Remarks on the Departure of President Jose Lopez Portillo of Mexico (June 9, 1981)
  126. ^ Appointment of the 1981 - 82 White House Fellows
  127. ^ Statement by Deputy Press Secretary Speakes on the Situation in the Middle East (June 11, 1981)
  128. ^ Remarks on Signing a Resolution and a Proclamation Declaring National P.O.W.-M.I.A. Recognition Day, 1981 (June 12, 1981)
  129. ^ Statement on the Reduction of Federal Regulations (June 13, 1981)
  130. ^ Letter to the Attorney General Directing an Assessment of the Voting Rights Act (June 15, 1981)
  131. ^ Nomination of Joan M. Clark To Be Director General of the Foreign Service (June 16, 1981)
  132. ^ Remarks on Signing a Veterans Medical Care Bill (June 17, 1981)
  133. ^ Letter Accepting the Retirement of Potter Stewart as Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court (June 18, 1981)
  134. ^ Nominations, June 19, 1981
  135. ^ Remarks at a White House Reception Opening the "Champions of American Sport" Exhibition (June 22, 1981)
  136. ^ Remarks on the Program for Economic Recovery at a White House Breakfast for Democratic Members of the House of Representatives (June 23, 1981)
  137. ^ "80 seized in White House protest". Chicago Tribune. July 4, 1981. 
  138. ^ "China warns U.S. it may use force to take Taiwan". Chicago Tribune. July 4, 1981. 
  139. ^ Message on the Observance of Independence Day, 1981 (July 3, 1981)
  140. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting the United States-Egypt Agreement on Nuclear Energy (July 6, 1981)
  141. ^ Remarks Announcing the Intention To Nominate Sandra Day O'Connor To Be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (July 7, 1981)
  142. ^ "O'Neill will push House on tax bill". Chicago Tribune. July 16, 1981. 
  143. ^ "Justice Dept. eyes probe of CIA chief". Chicago Tribune. 
  144. ^ "Reagan halts 10 jets for Israel". Chicago Tribune. July 21, 1981. 
  145. ^ Maclean, John (July 23, 1981). "Top Reagan aides blast Begin on Lebanon raids". Chicago Tribune. 
  146. ^ Neikirk, Bill (July 24, 1981). "Reagan agrees to indexing in tax cuts". Chicago Tribune. 
  147. ^ Message to the Senate Transmitting the United States-Sweden Supplementary Convention on Extradition (July 28, 1981)
  148. ^ Neikirk, Bill (July 30, 1981). "Bill passed by House, 238 to 195". Chicago Tribune. 
  149. ^ Statement on United States Immigration and Refugee Policy (July 30, 1981)
  150. ^ Nominations & Appointments, July 31, 1981
  151. ^ Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session With Reporters on the Air Traffic Controllers Strike (August 3, 1981)
  152. ^ Remarks on Receiving Unspent Fiscal Year 1981 Funds From the Agency for International Development (August 4, 1981)
  153. ^ "Reagan OKs neutron arms; European protests expected". Chicago Tribune. August 9, 1981. 
  154. ^ "'Harassed' strikers can return - U.S.". Chicago Tribune. August 8, 1981. 
  155. ^ Nominations, August 12, 1981
  156. ^ Nomination of Lenora Cole-Alexander To Be Director of the Women's Bureau of the Department of Labor (August 14, 1981)
  157. ^ Nomination of Michael H. Newlin To Be United States Ambassador to Algeria (August 17, 1981)
  158. ^ Oppenheim, Carol (August 19, 1981). "Reagan: I'll boost military, balance budget". Chicago Tribune. 
  159. ^ Nominations, August 18, 1981
  160. ^ Remarks on Board the U.S.S. Constellation off the Coast of California (August 20, 1981)
  161. ^ Nominations, August 28, 1981
  162. ^ Statement on the 41st Birthday of Press Secretary James S. Brady (August 29, 1981)
  163. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting an Alternative Plan for Federal Civilian Pay Increases (August 31, 1981)
  164. ^ Neikirk, Bill; O'Shea, James (September 2, 1981). "U.S. plans to ax 100,000 jobs". Chicago Tribune. 
  165. ^ Margolis, Jon (September 3, 1981). "Reagan adds 'chips' to nuke race". Chicago Tribune. 
  166. ^ Remarks in Chicago, Illinois, at the Annual Convention and Centennial Observance of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners (September 3, 1981)
  167. ^ Announcement of the Vice President's Leadership of the U.S. Delegation to the United States-Nigeria Bilateral Talks (September 4, 1981)
  168. ^ Nominations & Appointments, September 4, 1981
  169. ^ Nominations, September 16, 1981
  170. ^ Nominations, September 17, 1981
  171. ^ Remarks at the Dedication of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan (September 18, 1981)
  172. ^ Remarks in Denver, Colorado, at the Biennial Convention of the National Federation of Republican Women (September 18, 1981)
  173. ^ Remarks at a Breakfast Meeting With Representatives From the Private Sector Engaged in Volunteer Work (September 21, 1981)
  174. ^ Neal, Steve; Maclean, John. "Saudis won't share Iran's fate: Reagan". Chicago Tribune. 
  175. ^ Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the National Alliance of Business (October 5, 1981)
  176. ^ Proclamation 4869 -- General Pulaski Memorial Day (October 5, 1981)
  177. ^ Remarks About the Death of President Anwar el-Sadat of Egypt (October 6, 1981)
  178. ^ Nomination of Geoffrey Swaebe To Be United States Representative to the European Office of the United Nations (October 7, 1981)
  179. ^ "Reagan hails 3 former chiefs". Chicago Tribune. October 9, 1981. 
  180. ^ Nominations, October 14, 1981
  181. ^ Nominations & Appointments, October 30, 1981
  182. ^ Nominations, October 31, 1981
  183. ^ "Israel rejects Saudi plan for Mideast peace". Chicago Tribune. November 2, 1981. 
  184. ^ Remarks at the Welcoming Ceremony for King Hussein I of Jordan (November 2, 1981)
  185. ^ Toasts at the State Dinner Honoring King Hussein I of Jordan (November 2, 1981)
  186. ^ Nomination of John R. McKean To Be a Governor of the United States Postal Service (November 2, 1981)
  187. ^ Maclean, John; Neal, Steve (November 4, 1981). "Haig says he's being discredited". Chicago Tribune. 
  188. ^ de Lama, George. "Arab satellite OKd by U.S.". Chicago Tribune. 
  189. ^ "Regan: Economy will be 'a downer'". Chicago Tribune. November 10, 1981. 
  190. ^ "President: Hard times ahead". Chicago Tribune. November 11, 1981. 
  191. ^ "Rights chairman fired by Reagan". Chicago Tribune. November 17, 1981. 
  192. ^ "Hinckley being checked for any damage to brain". Chicago Tribune. November 17, 1981. 
  193. ^ "U.S. to press Russ on bid to cut arms". Chicago Tribune. November 19, 1981. 
  194. ^ "Reagan aide saved Allen job". Chicago Tribune. November 20, 1981. 
  195. ^ Remarks at the Dedication of the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress (November 20, 1981)
  196. ^ Nominations, November 20, 1981
  197. ^ "Budget battle a warmup for 1983". Chicago Tribune. 
  198. ^ Nominations & Appointments, November 27, 1981
  199. ^ Remarks by Telephone to the Plenary Session of the Caribbean and Central America Action Conference in Miami, Florida (November 29, 1981)
  200. ^ "Reagan vows no retreat from economic plan". Chicago Tribune. December 1, 1981. 
  201. ^ "Reagan and labor open peace talks". Chicago Tribune. December 1, 1981. 
  202. ^ Collin, Dorothy (December 1, 1981). "Benefits safe, Reagan tells elderly". Chicago Tribune. 
  203. ^ "Regan weighs jobs for fired controllers". Chicago Tribune. December 1, 1981. 
  204. ^ Appointment of Forty-Four Members of the President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives, and Designation of Chairman (December 2, 1981)
  205. ^ Appointment of Thirteen Members of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports (December 2, 1981)
  206. ^ Remarks at a Luncheon Meeting With Members of the President's Task Force on Private Sector Initiatives (December 2, 1981)
  207. ^ "Senate OKs B-1 bomber production". Chicago Tribune. December 4, 1981. 
  208. ^ Appointments & Nominations, December 4, 1981
  209. ^ Remarks on Signing the Energy and Water Development Appropriation Act, 1982 (December 4, 1981)
  210. ^ Statement on United States Intelligence (December 4, 1981)
  211. ^ "Khadafy calls Reagan a 'liar'". Chicago Tribune. December 7, 1981. 
  212. ^ "Report claims Reagan prefers Allen to resign". Chicago Tribune. December 7, 1981. 
  213. ^ "We have goods on Khadafy: Reagan". Chicago Tribune. December 8, 1981. 
  214. ^ "U.S. again expands Allen investigation". Chicago Tribune. December 9, 1981. 
  215. ^ "Reagan orders Yanks out of Libya". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1981. 
  216. ^ "25% could lose Social Security disability check". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1981. 
  217. ^ Announcement of the Creation of the President's Volunteer Action Awards Program (December 12, 1981)
  218. ^ "Reagan warns the Kremlin anew: Hands off Poland". Chicago Tribune. December 16, 2017. 
  219. ^ Margolis, Jon (December 18, 1981). "Reagan blames Soviet 'coercion'". Chicago Tribune. 
  220. ^ "Reagan suspends Israel pact over Golan annexation". Chicago Tribune. December 19, 1981. 
  221. ^ "Reagan being urged to OK big tax hikes". Chicago Tribune. December 22, 1981. 
  222. ^ "Economy in Poland near collapse: Haig". Chicago Tribune. December 25, 1981. 
  223. ^ "U.S. outlines crackdown on doctors owing to loans". Chicago Tribune. December 28, 1981. 
  224. ^ Gwertzman, Bernard (December 29, 1981). "Reagan eyes Soviet curbs". Chicago Tribune. 
  225. ^ Nominations & Appointments, December 29, 1981
  226. ^ Selection of Four Members of the Board of Directors of the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (December 30, 1981)
  227. ^ Letter Accepting the Resignation of Richard V. Allen as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (January 4, 1982)
  228. ^ Statement by Deputy Press Secretary Speakes on the Resignation of Richard V. Allen as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and the Designation of William P. Clark for the Position (January 4, 1982)
  229. ^ Nominations & Appointments, January 5, 1982
  230. ^ Remarks of the President and Chancellor Helmut Schmidt of the Federal Republic of Germany Following Their Meeting (January 5, 1982)
  231. ^ Statement on Continuation of the Registration Program Under the Military Selective Service Act (January 7, 1982)
  232. ^ Miller, Judith (May 31, 2001). "U.S.-SOVIET MEETING ON ARMS CUTBACKS WILL BEGIN JUNE 29; Transcript of speech, page A14.". New York Times. 
  233. ^ Apple, Jr., R. W. (June 9, 1982). "PRESIDENT URGES GLOBAL CRUSADE FOR DEMOCRACY; Text of Reagan's address, page A16". 
  234. ^ Weisman, Steven R. (June 12, 1982). "REAGAN, IN BERLIN, BIDS SOVIET WORK FOR A SAFE EUROPE". New York Times. 
  235. ^ Tagliabue, John (June 12, 1982). "THOUSANDS OF ANTI-REAGAN PROTESTERS CLASH WITH THE POLICE IN WEST BERLIN". New York Times. 
  236. ^ "VOTING RIGHTS ACT SIGNED BY REAGAN". New York Times. June 30, 1982. 
  237. ^ Geman, Ben (July 31, 2013). "Lawmakers Debate Whether to Name Ocean Waters After Reagan". The Hill. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  238. ^ "Ronald Reagan: Proclamation 5030—Exclusive Economic Zone of the United States of America". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved February 10, 2017. 
  239. ^ Boyd, Gerald M. (March 1, 1985). "Reagan Terms Nicaraguan Rebels ’Moral Equal of Founding Fathers’". New York Times. 
  240. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (April 20, 1985). "WIESEL CONFRONTS REAGAN ON TRIP; PRESIDENT TO VISIT BERGEN-BELSEN; SURVIVOR OF HOLOCAUST URGES HIM NOT TO STOP AT GERMAN CEMETERY". New York Times. 
  241. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (May 6, 1985). "Reagan Joins Kohl in Brief Memorial at Bitburg Graves". 
  242. ^ "Garn, Colleagues From Space Meet With Reagan". Los Angeles Times. June 5, 1985. 
  243. ^ Memorandum on the Generalized System of Preferences (January 2, 1987)
  244. ^ Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate on the Generalized System of Preferences (January 2, 1987)
  245. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on the Fiscal Year 1988 Budget (January 3, 1987)
  246. ^ Message to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate Transmitting the Fiscal Year 1988 Budget (January 5, 1987)
  247. ^ Announcement of the Presentation of the Presidential Citizens Medal to Larry M. Speakes (January 30, 1987)
  248. ^ Appointment of Charles D. Hobbs as Assistant to the President (January 30, 1987)
  249. ^ Appointment of Gary L. Bauer as Assistant to the President for Policy Development (January 30, 1987)
  250. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on Administration Goals (January 31, 1987)
  251. ^ Maclean, John N. (April 20, 1987). "U.S. calls for oil leasing in Arctic wildlife refuge". 
  252. ^ "Bush shares spotlight with Easter Bunny". Chicago Tribune. April 21, 1987. 
  253. ^ Cawley, Janet (April 22, 1987). "Senate panel grants Poindexter limited immunity". Chicago Tribune. 
  254. ^ "Reagan aims jokes, praise at media". Chicago Tribune. April 23, 1987. 
  255. ^ "Pentagon shells 'Star Wars' study". Chicago Tribune. April 24, 1987. 
  256. ^ Coates, James (April 25, 1987). "Grand juries indict 15 white supremacists". Chicago Tribune. 
  257. ^ "Reagan says trade curbs risk America's prosperity". Chicago Tribune. April 26, 1987. 
  258. ^ Nomination of Kenneth Y. Tomlinson To Be a Member of the Board for International Broadcasting (May 11, 1987)
  259. ^ Remarks to Congressional Leaders on Defense Spending (May 12, 1987)
  260. ^ Proclamation 5662 -- National Day of Mourning for the Victims of United States Ship Stark (May 23, 1987)
  261. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on Memorial Day and the Budget Deficit (May 23, 1987)
  262. ^ The President's News Conference (June 11, 1987)
  263. ^ Statement on the Proposed United States Arms Sale to Saudi Arabia (June 11, 1987)
  264. ^ Remarks at the Italian-American Conference on Private Sector Initiatives in Venice, Italy (June 11, 1987)
  265. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on International Trade (June 13, 1987)
  266. ^ Remarks at the Presentation Ceremony for the All-America Cities Awards (July 16, 1987)
  267. ^ Message to the Congress Transmitting the Annual Report on Environmental Quality (July 16, 1987)
  268. ^ Executive Order 12603 -- Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic (July 16, 1987)
  269. ^ Remarks Following Discussions With Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of the United Kingdom (July 17, 1987)
  270. ^ Nomination of Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., To Be a Member of the Board of Directors of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (July 17, 1987)
  271. ^ Remarks to Broan Manufacturing Company Employees in Hartford, Wisconsin (July 27, 1987)
  272. ^ Remarks at a Rotary Club Luncheon in West Bend, Wisconsin (July 27, 1987)
  273. ^ Message to the Congress Reporting Budget Deferrals (October 1, 1987)
  274. ^ Nominations and Appointments (October 1, 1987)
  275. ^ Remarks on Signing the German-American Day Proclamation (October 2, 1987)
  276. ^ Nominations and Appointments (October 2, 1987)
  277. ^ Informal Exchange With Reporters on the Supreme Court Nomination of Robert H. Bork (October 2, 1987)
  278. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on Voluntarism and the Supreme Court Nomination of Robert H. Bork (October 3, 1987)
  279. ^ Remarks at the Swearing-In Ceremony for William Steele Sessions as Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (November 2, 1987)
  280. ^ Nomination of Chandler L. van Orman To Be Administrator of the Economic Regulatory Administration at the Department of Energy (November 2, 1987)
  281. ^ Nomination of Ann D. McLaughlin To Be Secretary of Labor (November 3, 1987)
  282. ^ Address to the People of Western Europe on Soviet-United States Relations (November 4, 1987)
  283. ^ Nominations and Appointments (November 4, 1987)
  284. ^ Appointment of Frederick J. Ryan, Jr., as Assistant to the President (November 4, 1987)
  285. ^ Statement on Japan-United States Semiconductor Trade (November 4, 1987)
  286. ^ Nomination of Frank C. Carlucci To Be Secretary of Defense (November 5, 1987)
  287. ^ Nomination of Leonard H.O. Spearman, Sr., To Be United States Ambassador to Rwanda (December 1, 1987)
  288. ^ Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session With Area High School Seniors in Jacksonville, Florida (December 1, 1987)
  289. ^ Letter to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate Transmitting a Report on Soviet Noncompliance With Arms Control Agreements (December 2, 1987)
  290. ^ Statement by Assistant to the President for Press Relations Fitzwater on Soviet Noncompliance With Arms Control Agreements (December 2, 1987)
  291. ^ Remarks at the Swearing-In Ceremony for James H. Burnley IV as Secretary of Transportation (December 3, 1987)
  292. ^ Nomination of T.S. Ary To Be Director of the Bureau of Mines (December 3, 1987)
  293. ^ Nomination of Mark Sullivan III To Be General Counsel of the Department of the Treasury (December 4, 1987)
  294. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on Deficit Reduction and Soviet-United States Relations (December 5, 1987)
  295. ^ Proclamation 5750 -- Wright Brothers Day, 1987 (December 5, 1987)
  296. ^ Informal Exchange With Reporters on the Soviet-United States Summit Meeting (December 7, 1987)
  297. ^ Statement on Signing the Sentencing Act of 1987 (December 7, 1987)
  298. ^ Remarks and a Question-and-Answer Session With News Editors and Broadcasters (December 11, 1987)
  299. ^ Nomination of Hershey Gold To Be a Member of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy (December 11, 1987)
  300. ^ Radio Address to the Nation Following the Soviet-United States Summit Meeting (December 12, 1987)
  301. ^ Remarks to the Board of Trustees of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (December 14, 1987)
  302. ^ Appointment of Charles Nicholas Rostow as Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs (December 14, 1987)
  303. ^ Nomination of J. Daniel Howard To Be an Assistant Secretary of Defense (December 21, 1987)
  304. ^ Executive Order 12618 -- Uniform Treatment of Federally Funded Inventions (December 22, 1987)
  305. ^ Proclamation 5755 -- Year of New Sweden, 1988 (December 23, 1987)
  306. ^ Proclamation 5756 -- National Skiing Day, 1988 (December 23, 1987)
  307. ^ Proclamation 5757 -- National Day of Excellence, 1988 (December 23, 1987)
  308. ^ Executive Order 12620 -- Delegation of Authority With Respect to the Administration of Justice Program (December 24, 1987)
  309. ^ White House Statement on Imports From the European Economic Community (December 24, 1987)
  310. ^ Radio Address to the Nation on Voluntarism (December 26, 1987)
  311. ^ Statement on the Eighth Anniversary of the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan (December 27, 1987)
  312. ^ Executive Order 12621 -- President's Task Force on Market Mechanisms (December 29, 1987)
  313. ^ Order 12622 -- Adjustments of Certain Rates of Pay and Allowances (December 31, 1987)
  314. ^ Statement by Assistant to the President for Press Relations Fitzwater on the Veterans' Compensation Cost-of-Living Adjustment Act of 1987 (December 31, 1987)
  315. ^ de Lama, George (June 6, 1988). "Reagan says he sensed 'new hope' in USSR". Chicago Tribune. 
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