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  2. Gmail - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmail

    Common methods include entering a code sent to a user's mobile phone through a text message, entering a code using the Google Authenticator smartphone app, or by inserting a physical security key into the computer's USB port. Using a security key for two-step verification was made available as an option in October 2014. 24-hour lockdowns

  3. Android (operating system) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_(operating_system)

    The source code for Android is open-source: it is developed in private by Google, with the source code released publicly when a new version of Android is released. Google publishes most of the code (including network and telephony stacks) under the non-copyleft Apache License version 2.0. which allows modification and redistribution.

  4. Distributed computing - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_computing

    Distributed computing is a field of computer science that studies distributed systems. A distributed system is a system whose components are located on different networked computers, which communicate and coordinate their actions by passing messages to one another from any system.

  5. Food - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food

    Many plants and plant parts are eaten as food and around 2,000 plant species are cultivated for food. Many of these plant species have several distinct cultivars.. Seeds of plants are a good source of food for animals, including humans, because they contain the nutrients necessary for the plant's initial growth, including many healthful fats, such as omega fats.

  6. Electricity - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity

    Electricity would remain little more than an intellectual curiosity for millennia until 1600, when the English scientist William Gilbert wrote De Magnete, in which he made a careful study of electricity and magnetism, distinguishing the lodestone effect from static electricity produced by rubbing amber.