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  2. List of English words of Malay origin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of...

    Amok (also 'amuck' or 'amock') out of control, especially when armed and dangerous; in a frenzy of violence, or on a killing spree, 'berserk', as in 'to run amok'. Adopted into English via Portuguese amouco, from Malay amok ('rushing in a frenzy'). Earliest known use was in 1665 as a noun denoting a Malay in a homicidal frenzy. [4] [5] Angraecum

  3. List of loanwords in Malay - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_loanwords_in_Malay

    The Malay language has many loanwords from Sanskrit, Persian, Tamil, Greek, Latin, Portuguese, Dutch, certain Chinese dialects and more recently, Arabic (in particular many religious terms) and English (in particular many scientific and technological terms).

  4. Empowerment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empowerment

    Empowerment is the degree of autonomy and self-determination in people and in communities. This enables them to represent their interests in a responsible and self-determined way, acting on their own authority. It is the process of becoming stronger and more confident, especially in controlling one's life and claiming one's rights.

  5. Malayness - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malayness

    Malayness ( Malay: Kemelayuan, Jawi: كملايوان ‎) is the state of being Malay or of embodying Malay characteristics. This may include that which binds and distinguishes the Malay people and forms the basis of their unity and identity.

  6. Malaysian names - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_names

    A Malay's name consists of a personal name, which is used to address them in all circumstances, almost always followed by a patronym. Thus, most Malays do not use family names or surnames. In this respect, Malay names are similar to Icelandic naming conventions.

  7. Youth empowerment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youth_empowerment

    Youth empowerment programs are aimed at creating healthier and higher qualities of life for underprivileged or at-risk youth. [1] The five competencies of a healthy youth are: (1) positive sense of self, (2) self- control, (3) decision-making skills, (4) a moral system of belief, and (5) pro-social connectedness.

  8. Article 153 of the Constitution of Malaysia - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_153_of_the...

    e. Article 153 of the Constitution of Malaysia grants the Yang di-Pertuan Agong (King of Malaysia) responsibility for "safeguard [ing] the special position of the ' Malays ' (see note) and natives of any of the States of Sabah and Sarawak and the legitimate interests of other communities" and goes on to specify ways to do this, such as ...