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  2. Empowerment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empowerment

    Empowerment. Empowerment is the degree of autonomy and self-determination in people and in communities. This enables them to represent their interests in a responsible and self-determined way, acting on their own authority. It is the process of becoming stronger and more confident, especially in controlling one's life and claiming one's rights.

  3. Empowerment evaluation - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empowerment_evaluation

    An expanded definition is: "Empowerment evaluation is an evaluation approach that aims to increase the likelihood that programs will achieve results by increasing the capacity of program stakeholders to plan, implement, and evaluate their own programs." Contents 1 Scope 2 History and publications 3 Theories 4 Process use 5 Principles 6 Concepts

  4. Social work - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_work

    Definition. Social work is a broad profession that intersects with several disciplines. Social work organizations offer the following definitions: "Social work is a practice-based profession and an academic discipline that promotes social change and development, social cohesion, and the empowerment and liberation of people.

  5. Youth empowerment - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youth_empowerment

    Youth empowerment is a process where children and young people are encouraged to take charge of their lives. They do this by addressing their situation and then take action in order to improve their access to resources and transform their consciousness through their beliefs, values, and attitudes.

  6. History of social work - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_social_work

    Social work involves ameliorating social problems such as poverty and homelessness. The 19th century saw a great leap forward in technological and scientific achievement. There was also a great migration to urban areas throughout the Western world, which led to many social problems.

  7. Social model of disability - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_model_of_disability

    The social model of disability identifies systemic barriers, derogatory attitudes, and social exclusion (intentional or inadvertent), which make it difficult or impossible for individuals with impairments to attain their valued functionings. The social model of disability diverges from the dominant medical model of disability, which is a ...

  8. Capability approach - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capability_approach

    The capability approach (also referred to as the capabilities approach) is a normative approach to human welfare that concentrates on the actual capability of persons to achieve their well-being rather than on their mere right or freedom to do so. [1] It was conceived in the 1980s as an alternative approach to welfare economics. [2]