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  2. Kuraokami - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuraokami

    Kuraokami. Okami (淤加美神, Okami-no-kami) in the Kojiki, or in the Nihon Shoki: Kuraokami (闇龗) or Okami (龗), is a legendary Japanese dragon and Shinto deity of rain and snow. In Japanese mythology, the sibling progenitors Izanagi and Izanami gave birth to the islands and gods of Japan. After Izanami died from burns during the ...

  3. Ryūjin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryūjin

    Ryūjin ( 龍神, lit. "Dragon God"), which in some traditions is equivalent to Ōwatatsumi, was the tutelary deity of the sea in Japanese mythology. In many versions Ryūjin had the ability to transform into a human shape. Many believed the god had knowledge on medicine and many considered him as the bringer of rain and thunder, Ryūjin is ...

  4. Reina (given name) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reina_(given_name)

    Reina ( Yiddish: רֵיינָא) is also a Yiddish name referring to spiritual or ritual purity, also spelled Rayna or Reyna. [6] Raina, also spelled Reyna, ( Hindi: रैना) is also a Hindi given name and surname meaning “ night .”. Reina is also a Japanese name with different meanings depending on the kanji or hiragana symbols that ...

  5. List of Japanese deities - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_deities

    Oshirasama ( おしら様) Shinatsuhiko, a kami of wind. [25] Sukuna-Biko-Na ( 少名毘古那) A small deity of medicine and rain, who created and solidified the land with Ōkuninushi. Sumiyoshi sanjin, the gods of the sea and sailing. Sarutahiko Ōkami ( 猿田毘古神 ), a kami of the Earth that guided Ninigi to the Japanese islands.

  6. Ameonna - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ameonna

    Ameonna ( 雨 あめ 女 おんな, "rain woman") is a Japanese yōkai thought to call forth rain, illustrated in Toriyama Sekien 's Konjaku Hyakki Shūi as a woman standing in the rain and licking her hand. In modern usage in Japan, "ameonna" (or the male equivalent "ameotoko") refers to an unlucky person that seems to be jinxed to have the ...

  7. Raijin - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raijin

    Raijin ( 雷神, lit. "Thunder God"), also known as Kaminari-sama (雷様), Raiden-sama (雷電様), Narukami (鳴る神), Raikou (雷公), and Kamowakeikazuchi-no-kami is a god of lightning, thunder, and storms in Japanese mythology and the Shinto religion. [1] He is typically depicted with fierce and aggressive facial expressions, standing ...

  8. East Asian rainy season - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Asian_rainy_season

    The East Asian rainy season ( Chinese and Japanese: 梅雨; pinyin: méiyǔ; rōmaji: tsuyu/baiu; Korean: 장마; romaja: jangma ), also called the plum rain, is caused by precipitation along a persistent stationary front known as the Meiyu front for nearly two months during the late spring and early summer in East Asia between China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan. The wet season ends during the ...

  9. The Garden of Words - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Garden_of_Words

    Shinkai wrote the story as a tale of "lonely sadness", based on the meaning of the traditional Japanese word for "love", and uses shoes as a metaphor for life. The story's motifs include rain, Man'yōshū poetry, and the Japanese garden.